Inside Logistics

Construction begins on Oceanex Connaigra

Container/roll-on-roll-off freighter scheduled for 2013 delivery


October 18, 2012
by MM&D staff

ST JOHN’S, Newfoundland and FLENSBURG, Germany—A ceremony was held to mark the cutting of the first piece of steel that will eventually be incorporated into Oceanex Inc’s latest vessel.

The Oceanex Cannaigra, as it will be christened, was designed to be a 20-knot, ice-class, 210m ocean-going freighter. The company said once it is completed it will be “the largest Canadian flag container/roll-on-roll-off (Con/Ro) ship” in existence, having a deadweight carrying capacity of 19,500 tonnes.

It will be able to carry all sizes of containers, including the company’s high-cube 53-foot units, and will have a weather-deck load capacity of 11,000 tonnes. Its five Ro-Ro decks will be accessed by liftable ramps, a side ramp and a starboard side door, and will transport up to 95 tractor trailers and 500 cars. It will have a 12m (40ft) wide stern enabling it to carry over-dimensional loads weighing up to several hundred tonnes.

The Oceanex Connaigra will be driven by engines using a smokeless, common rail fuel management system and will carry three passive, anti-roll stability tanks and a gyro-controlled active fin stabilizer system. It will also have a dry scrubber exhaust gas cleaning system for the main engines and diesel generators and will be classified as a “clean ship” by international standards.

Flensburger Schiffbau-Gesellschaft mbH & Co KG of Germany is building the freighter, and is expected to deliver it in fall 2013. The Oceanex Connaigra will be the fourth ship in the short-sea shipping company’s fleet.

Oceanex executive chairman, captain Sid Hynes, said “construction of this unique ship represents an investment of more than $100 million, demonstrating Oceanex’s commitment to meeting the needs of our customers throughout Eastern Canada and particularly the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. The Oceanex Connaigra has been designed to meet the company’s anticipated growth for the next 30 years.”